Menopause and Clots

Can I take HRT if I have an increased risk of a blood clot? This factsheet provides information about HRT for women who have a risk (or history) of blood clots. It has been written jointly by Thrombosis UK and Dr Louise Newson, GP and menopause specialist When women reach the menopause, many suffer with…

The myths vs the facts

HRT is the most effective way to treat symptoms of the perimenopause and menopause, as well as protecting your bones and reducing the risk of a number of health issues, including cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. However, studies show that only around one in ten menopausal women who would benefit from HRT actually take it. Myth:…

HRT and breast cancer

The risk of breast cancer is many women’s main concern when they’re considering taking HRT. This is mainly due to a 2002 study by the Women’s Health Initiative that claimed HRT was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease. Fortunately this study has since been re-examined, and new research shows that,…

Brain fog

Brain fog is a very common symptom of the perimenopause and menopause, and many women say that their brains feel like ‘cotton wool’. You might have noticed that you’re increasingly forgetful, can’t remember names, lose your keys, write endless to do lists, and find it hard to retain information. This can make it especially hard…

Common misdiagnoses

You might be familiar with the more common symptoms of the perimenopause and menopause, such as hot flushes, night sweats and irregular periods. But fluctuating hormone levels can cause a surprising array of symptoms that you don’t necessarily associate with menopause, including low mood, anxiety, fatigue, memory problems and joint pains. Unfortunately, a lack of…

The benefits of HRT

The right type of HRT, at the right dosage, can do a great job of easing your symptoms of the perimenopause and menopause. Once you start taking HRT your symptoms should start to improve within three months – and often much more quickly. Remember, you don’t need to wait until you’re experiencing severe symptoms before…

How to ask your GP for help

If you suspect that you’re perimenopausal or menopausal, and your symptoms have started to interfere with your quality of life, it’s a good idea to make an appointment to see your doctor or a healthcare professional who specialises in the menopause. In most cases, your first point of contact will be your GP or the…

Am I perimenopausal or menopausal?

As every woman’s experience of menopause is different, there are a wide range of symptoms that could indicate that you’re entering the perimenopause or menopause. To make things even more confusing, these symptoms can come and go as your hormone levels change. You might experience physical symptoms like hot flushes, aches and pains, and bladder…